Tuesday, December 22, 2009

The "Research Division."





It was the holiday break of 2008 when Venkman and I struggled through a maze of dead plant life and stoic tree branches covering the asphalt path that had once been a driveway. Walking right past the empty, crumbling guard shack and into the complex's courtyard, the rare Midwest winter sunlight glimmered off the eerie, metallic lettering on the front of the building which read: Research Division.

Thursday, December 10, 2009

The "Greatest Show in Town."




It's not Ringling Brothers and it's not Cirque du Soleil, but it's a Cincinnati tradition that has traversed other mid-western cities and the entire nation since 1906. Usually stopping for three days of shows in the Queen City, the Syrian Shrine Circus has been hosted by both the Cincinnati Gardens and the Schumacher Center on UC's campus over the years, providing a more intimate and unique view into the American three-ring circus tradition that is rarely found today.

Monday, December 7, 2009

"Always Coca Cola"





Standing at the base of a pile of ruble that had once been 1/4 of the Ault & Wiborg Building, one couldn't help but remember the slogan that had been used from 1993-2000 by the soft drink giant who used this building as a billboard for so many years.

Thursday, December 3, 2009

Thirty Years Later and No Memorial to those who died in The Who Concert Tragedy




- US Bank Arena downtown, formerly known as the Riverfront Coliseum and completed in 1975, was the site of "The Who Concert Tragedy" on December 3rd, 1979.

It was exactly thirty years ago today that eleven concertgoers were trampled to death outside of what was then known as Riverfront Coliseum. As rock legends, The Who, began their sound check that evening, thousands of spectators crowded outside, pushed forward mistakenly thinking the concert was starting. Eventually arena officials opened the doors to the swarming crowd, the problem was they had hardly opened any doors at all.

Update: Six years after this article was published and thirty-six years after the incident, a marker was finally placed at the arena's plaza to memorialize the victims. Link